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Can You Reduce Your Risk of Breast Cancer?

The more you understand about any subject, the more interesting it becomes. As you read this article you’ll find that the subject of cancer is certainly no exception.

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Breast Health: 8 Things Every Woman Needs To Know

I always advocate self-care as the first step in preventing and treating health challenges. When it comes to breast health, the importance of self-care is a message I can’t share often enough. It is great to see pink ribbons everywhere in October during National Breast Cancer Awareness Month! If I had my wish, every pink ribbon would carry an additional important message for women. That message would read “You can improve your breast health and reduce the risk of breast cancer right now with a few simple lifestyle changes.” We may not be able to control where we live or our genetic risk factors- it’s true. However, a growing body of research is showing us that women really can make a difference in their breast health through diet, exercise, and weight management. These simple steps can help optimize your body’s hormonal balance and reduce the risk of developing breast cancer, and provide additional health, anti-aging, and disease-prevention benefits. We need to emphasize that everyone should be focusing on what we can control not what we can’t. – We can evaluate our hormone levels with a saliva test. The best way for premenopausal and postmenopausal women to know if their bodies have an imbalance of estrogen, progesterone and testosterone is to do a saliva test. Saliva Testing is the most accurate and easy way to this. We can use bio-identical hormones if we need hormone supplementation. Bio Identical means that the molecular structure of the hormones identically match the hormones made by our body as opposed to Pregnant Mare’s Urine which is natural to horses not humans. We can change our habits: reduce alcohol consumption and quit smoking. We can manage our weight and exercise daily. Studies also show that maintaining a healthy, average weight is just as important in favorably influencing the estrogen/progesterone ratio. Regular exercise is equally important. On the other hand, obesity, high insulin levels, alcohol intake, smoking, oral contraceptives, hormones from meat and meat products, pesticides, and herbicides can swing this ratio in the wrong direction. We can eat a balanced diet choosing Eat organic to avoid pesticides, herbicides, and estrogens in meat and dairy products. Include one to three servings of cruciferous vegetables like broccoli, bok choy, cauliflower, brussel sprouts, and cabbage in your diet each day. Studies show that Indole 3 Carbinol the active ingredient helps balance estrogen levels. We Can supplement wisely with EFA’s, essential fatty acids and use a fruit and vegetable concentrate if you do not eat 5 – 8 servings of fruits and vegetables daily. We can do BSE’s breast self exams becoming more familiar with our own body We can become better informed read...

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Breast Cancer and You; Risk Factors and Safety Precautions

Today’s woman is more knowledgeable and conscientious than ever about the risks of breast cancer. This is especially true for women over 40 years of age, who have crossed the threshold of increased risk of breast cancer. Age is so important to the development of breast cancer that about 76{d1a7922d6a0215ea507838fe0de84f98a032213acf0e4ae9d1fd55a6575c9b65} of women who develop it have no other risk factors other than age. However, all women, regardless of age or race, need to acknowledge the risk of developing it. All women are at risk. Women who have never smoked a day in their entire lives can develop breast cancer. Women who have been always been health conscious can also develop it. In fact, nearly one woman out of eleven will experience breast cancer. A staggering statistic by anybody’s standards! An estimated 211,000 new cases of breast cancer was diagnosed this past year. Even with the increased awareness programs, early detection through annual mammography screening and instruction for self-examination, breast cancer remains a leading cause of death for women. Breast cancer, like other forms of cancer, is a disease of the cells. In all, there are about fifteen different types of breast cancer. Some are more serious than others, but the one common factor each shares is that neither the cause nor the cure has been found. There are four recognized developmental stages of breast cancer: (1.) State 0: Cancer cells are present in either the lining of the milk glands (lobules), or in the tubes (ducts) that link the milk glands to the nipple. No cancer cells have spread to the nearby fatty tissue. (2.) Stage 1: Cancer has spread to nearby fatty tissue in the breast. Tumor size is about 1” or under; no cancer cells are present in surrounding lymph nodes. (3.) Stage 2: Size of tumor is 1” to 2” in diameter; cancer cells may have also spread to nearby lymph nodes. (4.) Stage 3: Cancer is locally advanced. Tumors are approximately 2” or larger in diameter, or tumors of any size have spread to lymph nodes under the arm or in the chest (above or below the collarbone). (5.) Stage 4: Metastatic, advanced breast cancer. The cancer has spread from the breast and lymph nodes to other parts of the body. Early detection of breast cancer remains a woman’s best chance of survival, and women of all ages should take advantage of all the resources available. Every woman should: 1.) Become educated about the risk factors associated with breast cancer. 2.) Become knowledgeable about the types, stages, and symptoms of breast cancer. 3.) Learn the correct procedure for self-examination tests, and perform them routinely. Long-term use of oral contraceptives, early...

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Breast Cancer and You; Risk Factors and Safety Precautions

Today’s woman is more knowledgeable and conscientious than ever about the risks of breast cancer. This is especially true for women over 40 years of age, who have crossed the threshold of increased risk of breast cancer. Age is so important to the development of breast cancer that about 76{d1a7922d6a0215ea507838fe0de84f98a032213acf0e4ae9d1fd55a6575c9b65} of women who develop it have no other risk factors other than age. However, all women, regardless of age or race, need to acknowledge the risk of developing it. All women are at risk. Women who have never smoked a day in their entire lives can develop breast cancer. Women who have been always been health conscious can also develop it. In fact, nearly one woman out of eleven will experience breast cancer. A staggering statistic by anybody’s standards! An estimated 211,000 new cases of breast cancer was diagnosed this past year. Even with the increased awareness programs, early detection through annual mammography screening and instruction for self-examination, breast cancer remains a leading cause of death for women. Breast cancer, like other forms of cancer, is a disease of the cells. In all, there are about fifteen different types of breast cancer. Some are more serious than others, but the one common factor each shares is that neither the cause nor the cure has been found. There are four recognized developmental stages of breast cancer: (1.) State 0: Cancer cells are present in either the lining of the milk glands (lobules), or in the tubes (ducts) that link the milk glands to the nipple. No cancer cells have spread to the nearby fatty tissue. (2.) Stage 1: Cancer has spread to nearby fatty tissue in the breast. Tumor size is about 1” or under; no cancer cells are present in surrounding lymph nodes. (3.) Stage 2: Size of tumor is 1” to 2” in diameter; cancer cells may have also spread to nearby lymph nodes. (4.) Stage 3: Cancer is locally advanced. Tumors are approximately 2” or larger in diameter, or tumors of any size have spread to lymph nodes under the arm or in the chest (above or below the collarbone). (5.) Stage 4: Metastatic, advanced breast cancer. The cancer has spread from the breast and lymph nodes to other parts of the body. Early detection of breast cancer remains a woman’s best chance of survival, and women of all ages should take advantage of all the resources available. Every woman should: 1.) Become educated about the risk factors associated with breast cancer. 2.) Become knowledgeable about the types, stages, and symptoms of breast cancer. 3.) Learn the correct procedure for self-examination tests, and perform them routinely. Long-term use of oral contraceptives, early...

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Breast Cancer, Its Causes

Breast cancer is a malignant tumor developed from cells of the breast, and it is one of the most common cancers affecting women. At this time it has not been established what is the exact cause of breast cancer, but the latest research clearly points to several risks factors; These are the highest breast cancer risk factors; the latest researches have established that in the age group above 50 years there is a high incidence; on the other hand, in the age group below 25 years the incidence is very low. It is very important to say that this disease is very aggressive in patient 25-50 years old. Menstrual cycle is another factor that should be considered; common in the ladies who have a longer menstrual life, i.e. the onset of their menstrual cycle is earlier and cessation of menstruation is late. Women that smoke and drink alcohol increase their risk of developing breast cancer. Breast cancer is developed more frequently in older single women and married woman that have not given birth to children, or if given birth then have not breast fed their offspring. The women that have had a breast cancer on one side have greater risk to develop cancer on the opposite side, and if there are incidences of breast cancer in their families (mother, sisters and daughters), they are at greater risk too. Breast cancer is linked with obesity and higher intake of saturated fatty acids . Breast cancer is linked too, with the continuous or sequential uses of combined oestrogen plus progestin hormone therapy (CHT) . Women that have been using oral contraceptives for more than ten years are more vulnerable to the development of this disease. On the other hand, women doing 4-5 hours of exercises per week reduce their risk of developing breast cancer. In short, these facts derive from the statistical analysis; they should not be taken as causative or predisposing...

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